NFFPC

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Wildland fires can be catastrophic for forests but also for homeowners and their property.  Fires are often caused by natural factors, but by far, the largest cause of wildfires is man-related.  Learning about wildfire prevention and what you can do to help will reduce the number of fires.  Preventing forest fires is everyone’s responsibility!  The Northeast Forest Fire Protection Commission's Prevention and Education Working Team (PEWT) offers several ways to take part.  See the Prevention section for more information.



HOT SPOT 

WILDFIRE IN THE NORTHEAST

This international workshop, the first of its kind, was a great success! A cross-section of state agency, federal agency and local jurisdictions were present at the three-day event which was geared towards providing insight into the differences and challenges of preventing wildfires in the Northeast. The organizers, speakers and participants were all leaders in the fields of prevention and mitigation within their respective agencies.


A big thank-you to the Prevention and Education Working Teams from both the Northeastern Forest Fire Protection Compact and the Middle Atlantic Interstate Forest Fire Protection Compact for organizing this unique conference.


More than a dozen speakers gave important and informative presentations. To consult each presentation visit or Workshop page.



CAUTION DURING OUTDOOR WINTER ACTIVITIES

NORTHEAST DROUGHT CONDITIONS AND FLAME/FUEL DRIVEN WARMING SOURCES

USED IN WINTER OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES CAN BE A DANGEROUS MIX


Much of the NortheastWildfire - NFFPC area suffered from different stages of drought this year. Reservoir levels are down and many ponds remain dry. Recent rainfall and even snow failed to extinguish a persistent and long burning wildfire in the southern part of the NFFPC area. Winter months usually mark a decrease in wildfire incidences…this year however, if dry conditions persist, wildfires can and will continue to occur.

Take extra care when engaged in outdoor activities this winter. Using any warming source or fuel type that produces heat can be dangerous in the woods.

DEVICES WHICH BURN FUEL
- propane heaters, pocket hand warmers, lighters, cigars .. cigarettes, candles, and small campfires

HUNTERS should also consider:
- that any scent sticks used to attract deer can continue to smolder long after they have left the woods

HANDWARMERS

LIGHTERS

DEER SCENT STICKS

TIPS TO ENJOY OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES AND KEEP WOODED AREAS SAFE FROM WILDFIRE 
- follow all manufacturer instructions and avoid any contact with forest fuels 
- proper disposal of all fuel sticks - don’t allow fuel sticks to drop onto the forest floor 
- take extra care with ignition sources such as lighters and matches
- proper storage of fuel
- deer incense sticks should be used only in areas void of forest fuels such as: 
- rocky areas
- areas cleared to bare soil
- remove used scent stick upon leaving your hunting area



Home Ignition Zone Workshop

Last October 18th and 19th, more than 30 members of the wildfire community attended the “Assessing Wildfire Hazards in the HIZ” Firewise workshop in Bangor, Maine.  The instructor, Pat Durland, provided a lot of easy fixes from roof to foundation to make homes safer from embers and radiant heat. Throughout the two day workshop, attendees had to review three homes and provide mitigation recommendations. The experience was a great a combination of in class and in the field training.




and remember...ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT WILDFIRES !