NFFPC

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Wildland fires can be catastrophic for forests but also for homeowners and their property.  Fires are often caused by natural factors, but by far, the largest cause of wildfires is man-related.  Learning about wildfire prevention and what you can do to help will reduce the number of fires.  Preventing forest fires is everyone’s responsibility!  The Northeast Forest Fire Protection Commission's Prevention and Education Working Team (PEWT) offers several ways to take part.  See the Prevention section for more information.



HOT SPOT 

"NATIONAL WILDFIRE PREPAREDNESS DAY" GRANTS

HELP US PUT LOCATIONS WITHIN THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES ANS EASTERN CANADA ON THE NFPA'S "NATIONAL WILDFIRE PREPAREDNESS DAY" MAP

Submit an application to NFPA’s Firewise or FireSmart Canada to participate in their “National Wildfire Preparedness Day” event before March 3, 2017 (USA) or March 17, 2017 (Canada) and your community could get a $500.00 grant.


NFPA has 150 separate $500.00 grants available for communities to do fuel reduction, wildfire reduction and education and outreach projects. 


The project doesn’t necessarily have to be done on May 6, 2017, but can be done later when the weather and your resources are more favorable. You do however, need to have some type of planning meeting or preparation take place on May 6, 2017.


To put your project on the map!


Or for more information visit:


www.wildfireprepday.org

www.firesmartcanada.ca/events




INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE PREVENTION
AND MITIGATION WORKSHOP

DRAWS ATTENDEES FROM ALL OVER THE NORTHEAST

Some public along with local, state and international wildfire agencies from the northeast and the US Forest Service attended the December 6–8, 2016 Wildfire in the Northeast Workshop in Mystic Connecticut.  This first of its kind, ‘HOW TO’ workshop was hosted by the prevention education working teams (PEWT) from the Northeastern (NFFPC) and Mid-Atlantic (MAC) Forest Fire Protection Compacts.  Funding for the event was provided by the USDA Forest Service.


The workshop, designed to teach and to answer how-to queries, did so from a varied and unique venue using active and passive methodology.  

When registering, attendees were surveyed for special prevention/ mitigation challenges their own communities/agencies faced.  Ideas for resolvement were addressed in breakout groups during the workshop.  

Skilled and experienced local, state and national leaders and wildfire professionals shared tried and true experiences they used to prevent and overcome prevention/mitigation challenges already faced and what they might expect in future.  Past, present and what to expect historical patterns of fire regimes/climatology, reading tree rings, the benefits of partnership between local and state wild land firefighting agencies, the use of Fire Prevention Education teams, what worked and did not work when Firewise techniques were used on wildfires, how to help prevent home ignitions using proven landscaping and construction guidelines, how to bolster youth prevention interest and situational awareness in your community, and how to effectively engage the public in proactive fire management efforts were some of the key issues presented.


On December 7th/day 2, a fitting and especially nice tribute to Pearl Harbor and the start of the Smokey Bear campaign with its ties to World War II was presented.


Almost 20 private and government/organization vendors mingled with workshop goers alike and engaged in the event.  Two vendors conducted live fire demonstrations outdoors using fire safety materials. Workshop goers walked through hallways, conference and vendor rooms filled with educational messaging displays, banners, presentation boards and ideas. 

Put wildfire prevention specialists in charge of an event, and you’ve got swag … lots of it. Promotional materials of all sorts purchased and donated from vendors and hosting agencies was in abundance.  All was presented and dispersed in a myriad of ways:  welcome bags, silent auction, raffle prizes, and by attendance and participation.  Take home deliverables such as the Wildfire in the Northeast pocket guidebook and its electronic application given every attendee will serve as an invaluable quick and handy resource for accessing prevention and mitigation information.


Attending foresters were able to earn Society of American Foresters approved CFE Credits along with some individual state accreditation.  The workshop received media coverage on its opening day and again on day 2 during the live fire demonstrations.


To consult each presentation or more information about the event, visit our Workshop page.




CAUTION DURING OUTDOOR WINTER ACTIVITIES

NORTHEAST DROUGHT CONDITIONS AND FLAME/FUEL DRIVEN WARMING SOURCES

USED IN WINTER OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES CAN BE A DANGEROUS MIX


Much of the NortheastWildfire - NFFPC area suffered from different stages of drought this year. Reservoir levels are down and many ponds remain dry. Recent rainfall and even snow failed to extinguish a persistent and long burning wildfire in the southern part of the NFFPC area. Winter months usually mark a decrease in wildfire incidences…this year however, if dry conditions persist, wildfires can and will continue to occur.

Take extra care when engaged in outdoor activities this winter. Using any warming source or fuel type that produces heat can be dangerous in the woods.

DEVICES WHICH BURN FUEL
- propane heaters, pocket hand warmers, lighters, cigars .. cigarettes, candles, and small campfires

HUNTERS should also consider:
- that any scent sticks used to attract deer can continue to smolder long after they have left the woods

HANDWARMERS

LIGHTERS

DEER SCENT STICKS

TIPS TO ENJOY OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES AND KEEP WOODED AREAS SAFE FROM WILDFIRE 
- follow all manufacturer instructions and avoid any contact with forest fuels 
- proper disposal of all fuel sticks - don’t allow fuel sticks to drop onto the forest floor 
- take extra care with ignition sources such as lighters and matches
- proper storage of fuel
- deer incense sticks should be used only in areas void of forest fuels such as: 
- rocky areas
- areas cleared to bare soil
- remove used scent stick upon leaving your hunting area




and remember...ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT WILDFIRES !